Solar Power – Girl Power – Green Power

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Light up their future!

Study by torch light

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Well-lit study

MACS is seeking the remaining funds required to light up the future for the girls of St Michael’s Girls’ Secondary School, Malindi by provide back-up solar power for their study rooms and dormitories.

Generous donors have already provided over £6,000.

Will you help us to raise the outstanding £39,000 to finish the job?

Girl Power

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Sunrise on Lake Malawi

The day starts early for the 600 girls of St Michael’s School on the shores of Lake Malawi. Their first study period runs from 4.30 to 5.30am, long before the sun rises. (In tropical Malawi daylight stretches from 6am to 6pm and varies little over the year.) The girls will settle to another two hours of study after sunset - but again only if the electricity is functioning.

 If the power goes off, a few can rely on small battery torches, the remainder simply return to their hostels to sleep. MACS aims to help all the girls to pursue their dreams in education by equipping twelve study rooms with solar powered back-up lighting.  

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To meet Rose Chikambi, Malindi's Headteacher, or to see trustee Adrian Brown's appeal presentation play the videos below.

Solar Power

Solar power offers clean and reliable lighting in a country where frequent power cuts affect those fortunate enough to have access to electricity. Those relying on the national grid experience daily rationing and lengthy “outages” lasting from a few hours to several weeks. This impacts severely on medical and educational facilities. In 2021, MACS provided solar power to twelve rural health centres. Now we are turning our attention to schools.

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Solar power for a health centre

Green Power

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More firewood from the forest

97% of households in Malawi rely on firewood or charcoal to provide the energy for cooking. Fewer than 1 in 10 people have access to the national electricity grid and that number shrinks to 1 in 100 in rural areas where 85% of the country’s population lives. Malawi lost over a third of its forest cover to firewood collection in the decades either side of the Millennium, resulting in land degradation and the silting up of the rivers, including the River Shire, which should provide hydroelectricity. In the short term the Malawi government is building its first coal-fired power station as well as several temporary diesel-fuel power stations with the inevitable damage to the environment.

Click here to help us light up the future for the girls of St Michael’s Girls’ Secondary School, Malindi.